Visual Glossary

Sidewalks

Sidewalks are defined as any paved pedestrian path adjacent to, and running primarily parallel to, a named roadway.

Guidance for modifying or creating new sidewalks can be found here.

SIDEWALKS: SURFACE MATERIAL

Material selected for the line segment should represent the material that makes up most of the surface for the segment.

Asphalt

 

Brick

 

Concrete

 

Mixed If there is more than one material present, and it is difficult to determine which material is predominant, choose “Mixed”.

Other In this case, the material type is wood.

Paver

Unknown  The material could not be determined from the aerial and Google Street View is not available.

SIDEWALKS: Type

Type of sidewalks are defined as path (at-grade) or grade-separated.

Grade-separated  This feature type should only be used if a pedestrian path is at a different grade than related roadway or it overlaps another (at-grade) sidewalk. This is not intended to capture roadway bridges with sidewalks.

Path  At-grade sidewalk adjacent to, or running primarily parallel to, a named roadway.

SIDEWALKS: REMOVE

Remove this sidewalk from the dataset. There is no sidewalk present at this time or the alignment shown is incorrect.

SIDEWALKS: Length

Approximate length of the sidewalk feature as calculated by the software. Not verified.

Ramps

A ramp (also referred to as a curb ramp) is a sloped section of sidewalk that transitions between a sidewalk and a road or driveway.

Guidance for modifying or creating new ramps can be found here.

Ramps: Status

Assumed – Ramps where the physical ramp cannot be confirmed, but assumed based on context (crosswalks, side flares, etc.) Please help us improve the inventory by registering to become an editor. You can use the tools provided in the Edit portion of the Pedestrian Portal to determine if the ramp is existing or missing.

 

Existing – Ramps that are confirmed from the aerial imagery via the identification of a detectable warning surface.

 

Missing  Ramp is not present at this location.

Ramps: Detectable Warning Surface

Is a detectable warning surface present? (A detectable warning surface means the ramp has a rough texture embedded in the surface.)

Yes

No

Ramps: Ramp Position

Ramp position describes the physical location of the ramp and how it conveys pedestrians from a sidewalk to a crosswalk.

Single Direction – Ramp that conveys pedestrians in only one direction, as represented with a single marked or unmarked crosswalk.

Note: ramp must be located within an intersection (defined as any location where two (2) or more named road centerline segments intersect.)

Multi-Direction – Ramp that conveys pedestrians in two or more directions, as represented with multiple marked or unmarked crosswalks.

Note: ramp must be located within an intersection (defined as any location where two (2) or more named road centerline segments intersect.)

Island / Median– Ramp located within a corner island, dividing island, or median surrounded by roadway.

Mid-Block – Ramp not located at an intersection or within an island / median.  As the name suggests, it is a mid-block conveyance of pedestrian traffic.

Other – For any ramp that does not meet one of the above criteria.  Used primarily at commercial entrances or aprons, where a roadway centerline does not exist.  Other ramps should not be used at roadway intersections.

Unknown – Any ramp that has an unclear type or is located at an intersection and does not connect to a crosswalk.

Ramps: Remove?

Remove this ramp from the dataset. This is only applicable in locations where recent infrastructure improvements have been made, where the data is now out of date.

Yes – The ramps circled in yellow on the left are no longer present in that location.

Crosswalks

Crosswalks are defined as any marked or unmarked paths across a roadway, most often found at intersections and connections between non‐intersection ramps.

Guidance for modifying or creating new crosswalks can be found here.

Crosswalks: Raised

Is the crosswalk raised? A raised crosswalk is where the crossing surface is elevated; often associated with a speed bump.  The crosswalk will also have a marking type that matches one of the crosswalk types listed below.

Crosswalks: Pedestrian Signalization

Is there a pedestrian signal at this crosswalk?

Crosswalks: Type

What type of crosswalk is it?

Bar Pairs – Perpendicular striping that is grouped into pairs throughout the crosswalk area.

Continental – Evenly spaced perpendicular bars.

Dashed – Dashed parallel striping that denotes the outer boundaries of the crosswalk area.

Decorative – A segment of crosswalk that contains geometric patterns, artistic scenes, or other non-traditional patterns.

Diagonal – Evenly spaced diagonal lines.

Ladder – Evenly spaced perpendicular bars with parallel striping abutting the bars on either side.

Parallel – Solid parallel striping that denotes the outer boundaries of the crosswalk area.

Solid – Solid marking that covers the entire crosswalk area.

Unmarked – A segment of crosswalk that is not marked on the roadway.

Unknown – Any segment of crosswalk that has an unclear marking type.

Crosswalks: Remove?

Remove this crosswalk from the dataset. There is no ramp present at this time.

Crosswalks: Length

Approximate length of the crosswalk feature. Not verified.